The nursing gaze: Power relations in a study of nurse-resident interactions in learning disability

V. M.H. Lau, P. Callaghan, S. F. Twinn, B. Goodfellow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The researchers observed nurse-resident interactions in learning disability units in Hong Kong and interviewed a purposeful sample of nurses who had varying levels of interaction. The median interaction rate between nurses and residents was 27.5% with most interactions relating to physical care. When not interacting with residents, nurses performed administrative tasks. Factors that influenced nurses' interactions revolve around their orientation to a new clinical setting, stresses in the care setting and nurses' coping strategies, contextual constraints, and nurses' prioritization of care. Support for Goffman's self-mortification principle, Foucault's notion of the clinical gaze and infantilism theory were evident in the practice of the nurses studied.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)346-355
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Care
  • Delivery
  • Impact
  • Learning disability
  • Organization

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The nursing gaze: Power relations in a study of nurse-resident interactions in learning disability'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this