Association of growth patterns during infancy and puberty with lung function, wheezing and asthma in adolescents aged 17.5 years: evidence from ‘Children of 1997’ Hong Kong Chinese Birth Cohort

Baoting He, Albert M. Li, Man Ki Kwok, Shiu Lun Au Yeung, Gabriel M. Leung, C. Mary Schooling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Rapid growth is related to adverse respiratory outcomes although possibly confounded or limited by growth modelling methods. We investigated the association of infant and pubertal growth with lung function, wheezing and asthma in a non-Western setting. Methods: In Hong Kong’s ‘Children of 1997’ Chinese birth cohort (n = 8327), weight during infancy and weight, height and body mass index (BMI) during puberty were modelled using a super-imposition by translation and rotation model to identify (larger or smaller) size, (earlier or later) tempo and (slower or faster) velocity. Sex-specific associations with forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), FEV1/FVC (Global Lung function Initiative z-score) and self-reported wheezing and asthma at ∼17.5 years were assessed. Results: For each fraction higher than average weight growth velocity during infancy, FVC was higher in boys (0.90 SD, 95% CI 0.35; 1.44) and girls (0.77 SD, 95% CI 0.24; 1.30), FEV1/FVC was lower (–0.74 SD, 95% CI –1.38; –0.10) and wheezing was higher (odds ratio 6.92, 95% CI 1.60; 29.99) in boys and an inverse association with FVC was observed for tempo but not for size. Associations for weight growth velocity in puberty were similar but weaker. Greater size and higher velocity of BMI growth was associated with higher FVC, lower FEV1/FVC and higher asthma and wheezing risk. Conclusion: Accelerated infant and pubertal weight growth were associated with disproportionate lung size and airway growth, and higher risk of asthma; optimizing early-life growth patterns could be important.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)440-449
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Epidemiology
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2023
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Lung function
  • asthma
  • birth cohort
  • growth

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